Seborrheic keratosis

From dermoscopedia academy

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 Editor: Ralph P. Braun

 Author(s): Lauren Fried
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Description Below are dermoscopic features commonly associated with the diagnosis “Seborrheic keratosis”. The example images have been approved by a panel of experts as representative of each given feature.


For a more in-depth discussion of associated features, please see the Dermoscopedia page for “Seborrheic keratosis”.

Author(s) Lauren Fried
Responsible author Ralph Braun→ send e-mail
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Status by Ralph P. Braun


Below are dermoscopic features commonly associated with the diagnosis “Seborrheic keratosis”.[1] The example images have been approved by a panel of experts as representative of each given feature.

For a more in-depth discussion of associated features, please see the Dermoscopedia page for “Seborrheic keratosis”.

Milia-like cysts[edit]

White-to-yellow, round structures that appear very bright when contrasted with their dark brown or black surroundings. Easier to visualize with non-polarized dermoscopy than with polarized dermoscopy.[1]

Comedo-like openings[edit]

Round to ovoid craters that have black or brown comedo like plugs.[2]

Moth-eaten (sharply demarcated) borders[edit]

Presence of a sharply demarcated and irregularly curved border; portions of the border are often scalloped, giving a moth-eaten appearance.[3]

“Fissures and ridges” / gyri and sulci / cerebriform pattern[edit]

Fissures (sulci) are linear comedo-like openings; they appear dark brown to black. Multiple fissures (sulci) and ridges (gyri) may produce a cerebriform pattern, where the structures resemble sulci and gyri of the brain.[4]

Fat-fingers[edit]

Linear and wide dermoscopic structures corresponding to ridges. Often short and sausage-shaped.[5]

Fingerprint-like structures[edit]

Fine parallel running lines of light brown to dark brown colors that resemble the dermatoglyphics of a human fingerprint.[6]

Hairpin (looped) vessels, usually with whitish halo[edit]

Hairpin vessels can appear as perfect “U”-shaped vessels, or can appear as “U”-shaped vessels that are twisted upon themselves.[7]

  1. Fried LJ, Tan A, Berry EG, et al. Dermoscopy Proficiency Expectations for US Dermatology Resident Physicians: Results of a Modified Delphi Survey of Pigmented Lesion Experts. JAMA Dermatol. Published online January 06, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.5213